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Events Calendar

NEXT 10 EVENTS ON OR AFTER September 26, 2017

[Show all events in September]

Thursday, October 5, 2017

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

NUTC Seminar / Sandhouse Event: "A Tale of Two Stations: Civil Engineering & Design of the WIlson & 95th Street Stations" - Chris Bushell, CTA

Northwestern University Transportation Center &; NUTC's Sandhouse Rail Group present:

"A Tale of Two Stations:  Civil Engineering &; Design of the CTA Wilson &; 95th Street Stations"

Chris Bushell
Chief Infrastructure Officer,  Chicago Transit Authority

Construction challenges associated with the new CTA Wilson and 95th street stations. Presentation will focus on the basic logistics of building major stations while still providing adjacent rail service and how these logistics impact cost and schedule.


Speaker Bio:

Christopher Bushell, Chicago Transit Authority, Chief Infrastructure Officer/Senior Vice President is a graduate of the University of Michigan where he received his Masters Degree in Architecture. Chris' career prior to CTA included design and construction management as a consultant to the Chicago Public Schools and later as the Director of Capital Renovations in the Chicago Public School's Department of Operations. In May 2004 Chris was appointed as the First Deputy Executive Director for the City of Chicago's Department of Construction and Permits. Since 2007 Chris has overseen the maintenance, construction, and engineering related to the CTA's rail infrastructure.

 

 

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, October 12, 2017

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

NUTC Seminar: "Efficiency from User-driven Service Order Adjustments in Collaborative Consumption of Supply in Transportation" - R. "Jay" Jayakrishnan

Northwestern University Transportation Center presents:

"Efficiency from User-driven Service Order Adjustments in Collaborative Consumption of Supply in Transportation"

R. "Jay" Jayakrishnan
Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering &; Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California at Irvine

 

ABSTRACT:

Newer technologies and high market penetration of personal communication systems along with the advent of autonomous and connected vehicle systems bring up many new possibilities for different paradigms of operation in transportation systems. Facilitated by significantly more peer-to-peer (P2P) communication, users in the future can consume transportation supply with more complete information on individual heterogeneity in utility satisfaction. Several possibilities exist in such a world of shared economy, with regard to using road and vehicle space in a temporally efficient manner. Breaking the traditional First-Come-First-Served paradigms with P2P monetary exchanges to compensate for utility disparities can improve system and user level efficiency. Car-sharing and ride-sharing are two of the more well-known systems of relevance. Autonomous vehicles bring up another dimension in terms of shared ownership as well. There is also recent research in collaborative negotiated consumption of other elements of transportation supply such as signal timings, and lane space availability. This presentation focuses on the possibilities, and discusses recent research into such mechanisms for signal and lane usage, and ride-matching in shared-ride systems. It also describes the associated pricing and behavioral issues where economic concepts such as envy-freeness are introduced as a basis for such schemes to be user-driven and equitable, without system level mandates.

 

SPEAKER BIO:

Prof. R. Jayakrishnan has been in the faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California at Irvine since 1991, after receiving his doctorate from the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests are in a variety of topics such as Traffic Flow Theory and Simulation, Transportation Systems Analysis, Network Modelling, Decision Theory, Intelligent Transportation Systems and Public Transit Design. Prof. Jayakrishnan has been a member of several professional committees, has served in the editorial committees of journals such as the ASCE Journal of Transportation Engineering and Transportation Research Part-C, and has served in several committees of the Transportation Research Board. He was a chair of the TRB subcommittee on Route Choice and Spatio-Temporal Processes. A paper co-authored by him received the Pyke Johnson Award for the best paper in planning submitted to the Transportation Research Board in 2009. Twenty doctoral students have graduated under his advice and he has over 100 refereed publications to his credit. He has been a visiting professor at other institutions such as the Ajou University in South Korea and the Amrita University in India.

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, October 26, 2017

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

NUTC Seminar: "The Marginal Congestion of a Taxi in New York City" - Alejandro Molnar, Vanderbilt University

Northwestern University Transportation Center presents:

"The Marginal Congestion of a Taxi in New York City"

Alejandro Molnar
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Vanderbilt University

 

ABSTRACT:

We exploit the introduction of a new class of restricted taxi medallion in New York City to provide a causal estimate of the impact on congestion from the addition of taxis to the city. In August 2013 the City of New York introduced a restricted class of “boro” (or “green”) taxis. Boro taxis provide an equivalent service to that of “yellow” medallion taxis, but are restricted from pickups in Manhattan south of a boundary along East 96th St and West 110th St. We document a large spike in taxi cab activity north of the restriction boundary, driven entirely by entry from boro taxis and partially offset by retrenchment from traditional yellow medallion taxis, which face additional, localized competition. This variation allows us to study the effect of taxi supply on congestion: we construct a database of historical street-
level speed from taxi trip records by isolating the trips that consist of uptown or downtown “runs” along a North-South avenue, and projecting travel time onto street intervals. We find that the roll-out of the boro taxi program caused a localized 8% decrease in traffic speed. We then relate speed changes to taxi supply, by employing satellite and aerial orthoimagery to construct a novel data set of the location of taxis over time and space. We derive an empirical congestion curve between car speed and taxi activity.

[In progress: Additionally, we document a substantial slowdown in traffic speed throughout NYC since 2013, and are applying our estimate to attribute the share of this slowdown that can be explained by app-based rideshare providers.]

 

SPEAKER BIO:

Alejandro Molnar is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on market structure, competition and regulation in transportation and ecommerce industries. His dissertation research was on airline incentives in scheduling and a resulting "tragedy of the commons" outcome in the allocation of runway capacity at US airports. He received his PhD in Economics from Stanford University, and undergraduate degree from the Universidad de Buenos Aires.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, November 2, 2017

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

NUTC Seminar: "Agent-Based Activity/Travel Microsimulation: What's Next?" - Eric Miller, University of Toronto

Northwestern University Transportation Center presents:

"Agent-Based Activity/Travel Microsimulation: What's Next?"

Eric Miller
Professor, Department of Civil Engineering - Director, University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute (UTTRI), University of Toronto

 

ABSTRACT:

Activity/tour-based models of urban travel demand are increasingly be used in operational planning practice. These are generally implemented within a microsimulation framework, in which out-of-home activity participation and the associated travel are modelled for individual trip-makers (agents). These operational model systems are the product of over 40 years of research and development, dating back at least to calls in the 1970's for an activity-based approach to modelling travel demand. They are also built upon the tremendous advances that have been made over this same time period in disaggregate, random utility modelling, computer hardware and software, and GIS-based spatial-temporal datasets, among other factors.

The rapidly growing availability of “big data” concerning travel behaviour from a variety of sources, continuing growth in computing capabilities, and ever-changing (and increasingly challenging) policy analysis issues (autonomous vehicles, new services such as car/bike sharing, increasing emphasis on active transportation, etc.) create both the opportunity and the need to continue to develop more advanced, robust travel demand modelling methods to help guide the continuing explosive growth of urban regions in Asia and worldwide along more sustainable paths.

Agent-based microsimulation (ABM) provides an extremely flexible, powerful and efficient means for modelling complex spatial-temporal, socio-economic behaviour such as travel. The current operational models represent a sound “first generation” of such methods, but they are far from realizing the full potential of the ABM concept. After first briefly characterizing the ABM approach and the current state of art/practice, this presentation explores a number of needs and opportunities for future evolution of ABM activity/travel modelling.

Topics discussed will include:
• Dynamics (memory, inertia, state dependencies, adaptation, etc.).
• Heterogeneity.
• Inter-agent interactions (within household and between households).
• Mode and route choice modelling (transit, active transportation, new modes).
• Activity episode utility (why do we travel?).
• Issues in modelling spatial choice (activity episode locations).
• Modelling intercity (long-distance) travel.

 

SPEAKER BIO:

Professor Eric J. Miller has BASc and MASc degrees from the University of Toronto and a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He been a faculty member in the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto since 1983, where he is currently Director of the University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute. He served as Acting Chair of the Department of Civil Engineering during 1998-99, 2003 and 2007 and was the inaugural Director of the University of Toronto Cities Centre (2008-2012). He is also Director of the University's Data Management Group, which is responsible for the largest travel survey data collection and management program in Canada, and the Travel Modelling Group, which works closely with transportation agencies in the Toronto region in improving the operational state of travel demand modelling practice in the region. He is past-Chair of the U.S. Transportation Research Board (TRB) Committee on Travel Behavior and Values, the International Association for Travel Behaviour Research and the TRB Sub-Committee on Integrated Transportation – Land Use Modeling. He is a Member Emeritus of the TRB Transportation Demand Forecasting Committee. He served on the TRB Task Force on Moving Activity-Based Approaches to Practice and the US National Academy of Sciences Committee for Determination of the State of the Practice in Metropolitan Area Travel Forecasting. He has chaired or been a member of numerous intercity travel demand modelling peer review panels throughout North America, including current membership on the California High-Speed Rail Authority's Ridership Technical Advisory Panel. Professor Miller is the recipient of the 2009 Wilbur S. Smith Distinguished Educator Award from the Institute of Transportation Engineers and the inaugural winner of the University of British Columbia Margolese National Design for Living Award (2012). Professor Miller is the developer of GTAModel, a state-of-the-art activity-based microsimulation regional travel demand modeling system used by the Cities of Toronto and Mississauga to forecast travel demand in the Greater Toronto-Hamilton Area (GTHA) and ILUTE, an integrated land use – travel demand model system for the GTHA. His international experience includes transit planning in Cairo, travel demand model development in Mumbai and Hyderabad, and currently he is working on urban mobility solutions for Latin American cities in Paraguay and Uruguay. He is co-author of the textbook Urban Transportation Planning: A Decision-Oriented Approach, the third edition of which was recently released in e-book format.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, November 9, 2017

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

NUTC Seminar: "Models and Approaches to Multi-Objective Arc Tour Problems with an Application to Marathon Course Design" - Mehmet Basdere, Northwestern University

Northwestern University Transportation Center presents:

"Models and Approaches to Multi-Objective Arc Tour Problems with an Application to Marathon Course Design"

Mehmet Basdere
PhD Candidate, Industrial Engineering &; Management Sciences
Northwestern University


ABSTRACT:
Motivated by marathon course design, our study introduces a novel tour finding problem, the Lock-Free Arc Tour Problem (LFATP), which ensures that the resulting tour does not block access to certain critical vertices. The LFATP is formulated as a mixed integer linear program. Structurally, the LFATP yields excessive subtour formation, causing the standard branch-and-cut approach to perform poorly even with valid inequalities derived from locking properties of the LFATP. For this reason, we introduce path-based reformulations arising from a provably stronger disjunctive program, where disjunctions are obtained by fixing the visit orders in which must-visit edges are visited. In computational tests, the reformulations are shown to yield up to 100 times improvement in solution times. Additional tests demonstrate the benefits of using lock elimination inequalities and the value of reformulations for more general tour finding problems with visit requirements and length restrictions. To solve LFATP in a multi-objective environment, we develop a new Interactive Weight Region-Based Approach (IWRA) that iteratively reaches a most preferred solution of the corresponding linear or integer program after exploring a few nondominated solutions. Practical insights from the Bank of America Chicago Marathon are presented along with extensions of reformulations for various types of objective functions.

 
SPEAKER BIO:
Mehmet Basdere is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences at Northwestern University. He received his bachelor's and master's degree in industrial engineering from Bogazici University, Turkey. His research interests include continuous and discrete optimization, multi-objective decision making and disjunctive programming with applications to logistics, routing, scheduling and wireless sensor network problems. During his PhD studies, Mehmet received Arthur P. Hurter Award, awarded to the most successful first-year graduate students at Northwestern University IEMS Department, Nemhauser Best Student Paper Award, awarded to the most successful graduate student paper at Northwestern University IEMS Department, and Dissertation Year Fellowship, awarded by Northwestern University Transportation Center to fund the most successful dissertation projects.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/