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Past Executive Education Programs

2017

Freight Transportation & Logistics: Navigating the Growing Challenges, from the First Mile to the Last Mile, in Transportation

WHEN: May 22 - 24, 2017

WHERE: Northwestern University Jacobs Center - 2001 Sheridan Rd #101, Evanston, IL 60208
Registration Fee: $2700
Early Bird Rate: $2160 (before April 20, 2017)
CSCMP members receive an additional 5% discount on the lowest rate.

The global transportation and logistics market is changing before our eyes. Many challenges are upon us—slowing trade, anemic domestic economies, growing regulation, looming talent shortages, aging infrastructure, and many more. At the same time, there have never been more opportunities—inexpensive fuel, more efficient vehicles, improved systems and an explosion of useful apps, greater use of mobile technology, nimble business models, new capital pouring into the space, greater analytics and tools to name a few. The advent and rapid expansion of eFulfillment has stressed the system—the network, service levels, economics, etc.—from the first to the last mile. Carriers, customers, investors and the like are all being put to the test. The playbooks of the past—that gave us higher productivity in transportation, lower costs and cheaper rates for shippers—no longer apply. It is a time for a change in our thinking and approaches.

NUTC has offered courses to help executives navigate the shifting landscape. Executives have day jobs—and their plates are now full. This course is designed to discuss those changes in transportation and logistics—highlighting what you need to know to improve your effectiveness in this new environment. From the standpoint of the changing logistics equation, the course examines both domestic and international modes—how they are changing and what these changes mean. The course also provides useful tools for coping with that change—for operators, shippers, investors and others—in a format that combines lecture, case study and interactive sessions.

Program Topics:
  • Overall Domestic Trends
  • North American Trucking
  • North American Railroads
  • North American Intermodal
  • Third Party Logistics (3PLs)
  • Transportation Management
  • Transportation Economics
  • International Logistics Trends
  • Air Cargo
  • Global Sourcing
  • Ocean / Maritime
  • eCommerce Trends
  • Package / Parcel Shipping
  • Data and Analytics
  • Supply Chain Network Optimization
  • Omni-Channel Retailing Logistics
  • eFulfillment Technology and Trends

Co-sponsored by the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP).

 

2016

Freight Transportation & Logistics: Managing in a World of Rapidly Advancing Technology

WHEN: May 9-11, 2016
Registration Fee: $2700
Early Bird Rate: $2160 (before April 9, 2016)

In the current business environment rapidly advancing technological changes are impacting how operators and shippers are managing their business. Freight transportation and logistics decisions must be managed with regard to pricing, service, access, mode selection, and contractual arrangements. Access to new and evolving tools and methodologies to interpret data sets, generate useful information and collaborate impacts these decisions, requiring both the transportation buyers and sellers to continually adapt in this changing landscape.

To address these challenges, the Northwestern University Transportation Center has developed a customized program for transportation and logistics executives and those who invest, raise capital, and provide services for the sector. This executive program will provide insight into the rapidly changing domestic and international transportation industry, including air, rail, truck, marine, package, third party logistics, and other non-asset sectors such as brokerage.

Sign up Now for Freight and Logistics: Managing in a World of Rapidly Advancing Technology to be held on May 9-11, 2016, at the Northwestern University Transportation Center in Evanston, Illinois.

Topics include:

Day 1

  • Overall Domestic Trends
  • North American Trucking
  • North American Railroads
  • North American Intermodal
  • Third Party Logistics (3PLs)
  • Transportation Management
  • Transportation Economics

Day 2

  • International Logistics Trends
  • Air Cargo
  • eFreight and Freight Intermediaries Panel Discussion
  • Global Sourcing Simulation Exercise
  • Ocean / Maritime

Day 3

  • eCommerce Trends
  • Package / Parcel Shipping
  • Data and Analytics
  • Supply Chain Network Optimization
  • Omni-Channel Retailing Logistics
  • eFulfillment Technology and Trends

Co-sponsored by the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP).

2015

Freight Transportation & Logistics: Securing Capacity in a Dynamic Industry

WHEN: June 15-17, 2015

In the current business environment operators and their customers are experiencing a capacity constrained global market and rising cost structures. In this dynamic situation, freight transportation and logistics decisions must be managed with regard to pricing, service, access, mode selection, and contractual arrangements. Strategies for success for both the transportation buyers and sellers must continually adapt in this changing landscape.

To address these challenges, the Northwestern University Transportation Center has developed a customized program for transportation and logistics executives and those who invest, raise capital, and provide services for the sector. The 2015 program provided insight into the rapidly changing domestic and international transportation industry, including air, rail, truck, marine, package, third party logistics, and other non-asset sectors such as brokerage.

Topics covered included:
  • Overall Domestic Trends
  • Motor Carriers
  • Railroads
  • Intermodal
  • Data and Analytics
  • Third Party Logistics (3PLs)
  • International Logistics Trends
  • Global Sourcing
  • Air Cargo
  • Ocean / Maritime
  • Freight Intermediaries
  • eCommerce Trends
  • Package / Parcel Shipping
  • Freight Brokerage

Co-sponsored by the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP).

 

2013

Freight Transportation & Logistics: Delivering Results in a Volatile Environment

WHEN: September 9-11, 2013

Download the program brochure

During this period of economic uncertainty, operators and their customers (those who buy freight) face a volatile business landscape and shifting opportunities and expectations.  Variability must be managed in freight transportation and logistics decisions with regard to pricing, service, access, mode selection, and contractual arrangements.  Strategies for success for both the transportation buyers and sellers must continually adapt in this environment.

To address these challenges, the Northwestern University Transportation Center has developed a customized program for transportation and logistics executives and those who invest, raise capital, and provide services for the sector.  This executive program will provide insight into the rapidly changing domestic and international transportation industry, including air, rail, truck, marine, package, third party logistics, and other non-asset sectors such as brokerage.

Questions that will be addressed:
  • How is the volatile business environment and economic uncertainty impacting domestic/international freight transport?
  • How have customers’ logistics expectations changed in meeting their transport/logistics needs?
  • What are the relative competitive factors among the various modes in terms of access/availability, price and service?
  • What regulatory changes can be expected that will impact the shipper/carrier relationships?
  • What changes are needed in mode and carrier selection?
  • What forces are driving these changes - how can you better anticipate and take advantage of them going forward?
  • What new services and solutions are emerging from third party logistics providers? How applicable are these to my company’s requirements?
  • What are the roles of freight intermediaries and how can they be used to a shipper’s advantage?
  • How is technology being leveraged to improve operational performance and service quality?
  • How can carriers gain advantage in the new environment?
  • What do those changes mean to logistics strategies? How do shippers achieve leverage?
Who Should Attend

The course is aimed at decision-makers and investors in transportation and logistics including shippers that have to purchase freight transportation domestically or internationally and those in the logistics, traffic, sourcing and finance functions. In addition, carrier staff and line executives who have the operating, marketing, financial responsibility in freight will benefit. Included would be professionals from the marketing, sales, planning, and services functions in transportation. This course will also have value for investors, equipment and service providers to the transportation and logistics sectors.

Course Format

Program content will be thoroughly integrated by the course faculty, so that participants will emerge with a comprehensive understanding and perspective of both domestic and international transportation sectors. Both Northwestern faculty and outside lecturers will lead the program.

The focus of the course is on the changing nature of relationships between shippers and carriers. Some prior knowledge and experience in logistics and transportation will be useful.


Co-sponsored by the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP).

 

2012

Pricing Highway Infrastructure

WHEN: September 10-12, 2012

Download program brochure

A specially designed executive program for professionals in both the private and public sectors focusing on the principles and methods of pricing highway infrastructure.

Funding of highways is at a crossroads. Traditional funding mechanisms, such as gasoline- tax revenues, are proving to be insufficient to maintain existing facilities and fund expanded capacity. Government agencies are looking to users to make up for the shortfall.  Highway infrastructure offers an exceptional opportunity for raising funds to establish and/or sustain such infrastructure while providing an attractive return on investment to both public and private investors. Key to achieving such returns are the prices charged to users. But how should user charges be set? 

  • Should every user pay the same fee?
  • Is it practical, commercially worthwhile, and socially acceptable to charge user fees?
  • How are these pricing principles changed when the facility is congested?
  • What methods can be used to forecast future revenue streams?
  • How does the pricing of an individual link affect the performance of the neighboring highway network?
  • How does private operation of a facility change the pricing objectives?
  • How might the public sector regulate prices?

These questions and more will be addressed in this three day course offered by the Transportation Center at Northwestern University.

Topics to be covered include:
  • Global freight marketplace size, scope, and complexity
  • Forces driving change in transportation and logistics
  • Industry trends in supply chain and logistics
  • How customers buy freight in a volatile market
  • Understanding the cost structure of freight transportation services
  • Understanding the landscape of domestic freight (trucking, rail, intermodal, air, barge) and international freight (ocean, intermodal, air)
  • Using data to manage freight and logistics decisions
  • Emerging trends in the global third party logistics market: the providers’ perspective
  • The role of freight intermediaries (e.g. brokerages)
  • Global sourcing, including near-sourcing, decisions in a dynamic environment
  • Carrier strategies for leadership, differentiation, and growth
Who Should Attend

The course is aimed at professionals who currently, or may in the future, set user charges; financial personnel; engineers and project managers who oversee facility maintenance and new construction; and government officials who may manage programs of fee-paying private or public facility provision. It is also applicable to consultants to infrastructure providers, and those who finance infrastructure projects.

Course Format

The focus of the course is on the economics of pricing. Some prior knowledge of economics, such as might be obtained from an introductory college-level microeconomics course, will be useful. The course will run from 8:30am until 5pm on Monday and Tuesday. It will conclude at 4pm on Wednesday.


Co-sponsored by the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP).

 

Freight Transportation & Logistics: Delivering Results in a Volatile Environment

WHEN: May 14-16, 2012

During this period of economic uncertainty, operators and their customers (those who buy freight) face a volatile business landscape and shifting opportunities and expectations. Variability must be managed in freight transportation and logistics decisions with regard to pricing, service, access, mode selection, and contractual arrangements. Strategies for success for both the transportation buyers and sellers must continually adapt in this environment.

To address these challenges, the Northwestern University Transportation Center has developed a customized program for transportation and logistics executives and those who invest, raise capital, and provide services for the sector. This executive program will provide insight into the rapidly changing domestic and international transportation industry, including air, rail, truck, marine, package, third party logistics, and other non-asset sectors such as brokerage.

Questions that will be addressed:
  • How is the volatile business environment and economic uncertainty impacting domestic/international freight transport?
  • How have customers’ logistics expectations changed in meeting their transport/logistics needs?
  • What are the relative competitive factors among the various modes in terms of access/availability, price and service?
  • What regulatory changes can be expected that will impact the shipper/carrier relationships?
  • What changes are needed in mode and carrier selection?
  • What forces are driving these changes - how can you better anticipate and take advantage of them going forward?
  • What new services and solutions are emerging from third party logistics providers? How applicable are these to my company’s requirements?
  • What are the roles of freight intermediaries and how can they be used to a shipper’s advantage?
  • How is technology being leveraged to improve operational performance and service quality?
  • How can carriers gain advantage in the new environment?
  • What do those changes mean to logistics strategies? How do shippers achieve leverage?
Topics to be covered include:
  • Global freight marketplace size, scope, and complexity
  • Forces driving change in transportation and logistics
  • Industry trends in supply chain and logistics
  • How customers buy freight in a volatile market
  • Understanding the cost structure of freight transportation services
  • Understanding the landscape of domestic freight (trucking, rail, intermodal, air, barge) and international freight (ocean, intermodal, air)
  • Using data to manage freight and logistics decisions
  • Emerging trends in the global third party logistics market: the providers’ perspective
  • The role of freight intermediaries (e.g. brokerages)
  • Global sourcing, including near-sourcing, decisions in a dynamic environment
  • Carrier strategies for leadership, differentiation, and growth
Who Should Attend

The course is aimed at decision-makers and investors in transportation and logistics including shippers that have to purchase freight transportation domestically or internationally and those in the logistics, traffic, sourcing and finance functions. In addition, carrier staff and line executives who have the operating, marketing, financial responsibility in freight will benefit. Included would be professionals from the marketing, sales, planning, and services functions in transportation. This course will also have value for investors, equipment and service providers to the transportation and logistics sectors.

Course Format

Program content will be thoroughly integrated by the course faculty, so that participants will emerge with a comprehensive understanding and perspective of both domestic and international transportation sectors. Both Northwestern faculty and outside lecturers will lead the program.

The focus of the course is on the changing nature of relationships between shippers and carriers. Some prior knowledge and experience in logistics and transportation will be useful.


Co-sponsored by the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP).

 

2010

Pricing Transportation Infrastructure

WHEN: October 18-20, 2010

Download the program brochure.

Funding of transportation-related infrastructure is at a crossroads. Traditional funding mechanisms, such as general and specific tax revenues, are proving to be insufficient to maintain existing facilities and fund expanded capacity. Infrastructure providers and operators are looking to users to make up for the shortfall. Transport-related infrastructure offers an exceptional opportunity for raising funds to establish and/or sustain such infrastructure while providing an attractive return on investment to both public and private investors. Key to achieving such returns are the prices charged to users.
But how should user charges be set?

  • Should every user pay the same fee?
  • Is it practical, commercially worthwhile, and socially acceptable to charge differential prices?
  • How should the price be set relative to the cost of alternative modes or routings?
  • How are these pricing principles changed when the facility is congested?
  • Can pricing be used to reduce the problems of congestion?
  • How does private operation of a facility change the pricing objectives?
  • How might the public sector regulate prices?

These questions and more will be addressed in this two-and-half day course offered by NUTC.

Topics to be covered include:
  • Basic economic principles of pricing
  • Competitive price-setting
  • Demand responsive pricing
  • Congestion pricing
  • Differential prices across users
  • Auctions to allocate capacity
  • Social acceptability of pricing infrastructure
  • Political implications of infrastructure pricing
  • Pricing in a public/private partnership
  • Regulation of private-sector pricing
  • Evaluating investments in capacity enhancement
Course Format

The focus of the course is on the economics of pricing. Some prior knowledge of economics, such as might be obtained from an introductory college-level microeconomics course, will be useful. The course will run from 8:30am until 5pm on Monday and Tuesday. It will conclude at 12:30pm on Wednesday.

Freight Transportation & Logistics: Strategies for a Changing Landscape

WHEN: October 12 - 14, 2010

Download program brochure

The recent, deep downturn in the economy and its uncertain recovery have weighed heavily on the freight transportation sector, both in North America and on a global scale.  Double-digit volume declines, record bankruptcies, consolidation and downsizing across the board, and significant reductions in investments in plant and equipment are creating further challenges.  Externally, there have been considerable fuel price fluctuations and growing regulatory pressure at all levels. 

For operators, it has been a time of declining revenues, slim (if any) profits, pricing weakness and overcapacity.  For customers, many of whom have been downsizing as well, while it has been a “buyers’ market” in terms of rates.  There have also been unstable relationships with some vendors, and constantly changing factors in optimizing their logistics networks and operations to support less traffic to satisfy their customers’ demands.  Both large and small, domestic and international companies have been impacted. 

As the economy creeps back, both operators and their customers - those who buy freight - will face a different landscape and new opportunities and expectations. Changes are already being seen in pricing, service, access, availability and contractual arrangements.  Strategies for success - for both the transport buyers and sellers - must and will change going forward.

Sample questions that will be addressed:
  • How have customers’ logistics expectations changed in meeting their transport/logistics needs?
  • How has the field of play changed in domestic/international freight transport?
  • How competitive will the modes be going forward in terms of access/availability, price and service?
  • What regulatory changes can be expected that will impact the shipper/carrier relationships?
  • What changes are needed in mode and carrier selection?
  • How well positioned are the growing number of intermediaries/third parties in the logistics space?
  • What forces are driving these changes - how can you better anticipate and take advantage of them going forward?
  • How can carriers gain advantage in the new environment?
  • What do those changes mean to logistics strategies?  How do shippers achieve leverage?
Topics covered include:
  • Forces for change in transportation and logistics
  • Global freight marketplace size, scope, and complexity
  • Customers’ perspective on emerging trends and needs in logistics
  • How customers buy freight -- the new imperatives
  • Understanding carrier pricing
  • Applying analytics in freight transportation
  • Domestic freight changes/challenges air, package, marine, truck, barge, pipeline
  • International freight changes/challenges air cargo, ocean, forwarding, customers
  • Role of non-asset players 3PL, 4PL, brokerage
  • Shipper strategies for success, competitive advantage
  • Carrier strategies for leadership, differentiation, and growth
Course Format

Program content will be thoroughly integrated by the course faculty, so that participants will emerge with a comprehensive understanding and perspective of both domestic and international transportation sectors. Both Northwestern faculty and outside lecturers will lead the program.

The focus of the course is on the changing nature of relationships between shippers and carriers. Some prior knowledge and experience in logistics and transportation will be useful.

Coping with Carbon: Sustainable Strategies for the Transportation and Logistics Enterprise

WHEN: September 14-16, 2010

Download the program brochure.

Coping with carbon is a clear challenge for all transportation modes and for those providing a wide range of supply chain services. This groundbreaking program will incorporate issues and strategies
relevant to numerous transport and supply-chain decisions. Participants will benefit from interaction with executive-level peers, logistics managers, and academics representing a wide range of transportation modes.

An underlying principle of the program is that, while each mode and method of transportation and every aspect of supply-chain management faces different challenges, what is being done or contemplated in one setting (e.g., a transportation mode) will prove of interest and value to others that produce or “consume” transport and logistics services. Innovations for limiting carbon emissions and for energy conservation through technology and revised operating practices will also be stressed.

Sample questions that will be addressed:

  • What fuel substitutions are available to reduce carbon emissions?
  • Which technological advances are the most likely – and most practical – to reduce the release of carbon?
  • What are the implications for competition between carriers and logistics services providers?
  • Will domestic-only carriers be subject to different constraints than international carriers?
  • What are the economic trade-offs between being “green” and increasing investment in inventory?
Topics to be covered include:
  • Importance of carbon emissions to transport and logistics
  • Rationale and means of carbon emission regulation
  • Cap-and-trade and carbon tax-based regulation
  • Alternative uses of carbon-derived public funds in a broader policy context
  • Technologies for reducing carbon emissions
  • Tactical use of GPS data to identify "green" routes
  • Modal differences in operational strategy to reduce carbon impacts
  • Compliance and enforcement of carbon emission regulation
  • What each form of energy can contribute to keep transportation and logistics "green"
  • International experiences and strategies for limiting carbon emissions
Course Format

Coping with Carbon will feature a series of 90-minute lecture/discussion sessions. Leaders will be highly qualified individuals from the academic community as well as others directly concerned with environmental mitigation. While several sessions will cover relevant theories, both scientific and economic, the greatest amount of time will be devoted to presentations by those with practical experience and responsibilities central to the challenge of "Coping with Carbon."

2009

Pricing Transportation Infrastructure

WHEN: November 16-18, 2009

Funding of transportation-related infrastructure is at a crossroads. Traditional funding mechanisms, such as general and specific tax revenues, are proving to be insufficient to maintain existing facilities and fund expanded capacity. Infrastructure providers and operators are looking to users to make up for the shortfall. Transport-related infrastructure offers an exceptional opportunity for raising funds to establish and/or sustain such infrastructure while providing an attractive return on investment to both public and private investors. Key to achieving such returns are the prices charged to users. But how should user charges be set?

  • Should every user pay the same fee?
  • Is it practical, commercially worthwhile, and socially acceptable to charge differential prices?
  • How should the price be set relative to the cost of alternatives modes or routings?
  • How are these pricing principles changed when the facility is congested?
  • Can pricing be used to reduce the problems of congestion?
  • How does private operation of a facility change the pricing objectives?
  • How might the public sector regulate prices?

These questions and more will be addressed in this two-and-half day course offered by the Transportation Center at Northwestern University.

This course is applicable to all transportation modes which have large infrastructure costs to be recovered, be it highways, port facilities, airports, waterways, or railroads. The course is also equally applicable to both private and public sector attendees.

Topics to be covered include:
  • Basic economic principles of pricing
  • Competitive price-setting
  • Congestion pricing
  • Demand responsive pricing
  • Differential prices across users
  • Auctions to allocate capacity
  • Social acceptability of pricing infrastructure
  • Political implications of infrastructure pricing
  • Pricing in a public/private partnership
  • Public regulation of private-sector pricing
  • Evaluating investments in capacity enhancement
Course Format

Program content will be thoroughly integrated by the course faculty, so that participants will emerge with a comprehensive understanding and perspective of transportation infrastructure pricing strategies

The focus of the course is on the economics of pricing. Some prior knowledge of economics, such as might be obtained from an introductory college level microeconomics course, will be useful.

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