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Events Calendar

EVENTS IN October 2017

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Thursday, October 5, 2017

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

NUTC Seminar: "A Tale of Two Stations: Construction challenges associated with the new CTA Wilson and 95th street stations" - Chris Bushell, CTA

Northwestern University Transportation Center &; NUTC's Sandhouse Rail Group present:

"A Tale of Two Stations:  Construction challenges associated with the new CTA Wilson and 95th street stations"

Chris Bushell
Chief Infrastructure Officer,  Chicago Transit Authority

CTA's Red Ahead program — a comprehensive initiative for maintaining, modernizing, and expanding Chicago's most-traveled rail line — includes two large-scale and challenging capital projects at each end of the route. The unique and complex construction challenges associated with two of the program's projects, the new CTA Wilson and 95th street stations, will be explored.

At the north end, the $203 million Wilson Station Reconstruction Project is modernizing a 94-year-old stationhouse and about a quarter-mile of more than 100-year-old track structure. The project includes about 2,200 feet of elevated tracks, signals and supporting infrastructure, engineering a long clear-span of Broadway at a severe angle, and maintaining service on a four-track line and busy rail station throughout the project. When the project is complete later this year, riders will have a modern, spacious and ADA-accessible station that will be a new transfer point for Red and Purple Line Express trains.

Meanwhile, at the south end of the Red Line, the $280 million 95th Street Terminal Improvement Project is one of the largest station reconstructions in CTA's history, creating a signature station featuring a modern design and myriad customer amenities. The project reconstructs the existing station and bus terminal, while building a second stationhouse and bus terminal across 95th St, linked by an overhead pedestrian bridge and at platform level. This work must be completed not only without unduly affecting Red Line service (including access to the train yard beyond the station), and within the constraints of the expressway median where the line is located, but also over the lanes of one of Chicago's busiest freeways.

The presentation will focus on the basic logistics of building major stations, as well as the particular challenges of these projects, while still providing adjacent rail service and how these logistics impact cost and schedule.

Speaker Bio:
Christopher Bushell, Chicago Transit Authority, Chief Infrastructure Officer/Senior Vice President is a graduate of the University of Michigan where he received his Masters Degree in Architecture. Chris' career prior to CTA included design and construction management as a consultant to the Chicago Public Schools and later as the Director of Capital Renovations in the Chicago Public School's Department of Operations. In May 2004 Chris was appointed as the First Deputy Executive Director for the City of Chicago's Department of Construction and Permits. Since 2007 Chris has overseen the maintenance, construction, and engineering related to the CTA's rail infrastructure.

 

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, October 12, 2017

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

NUTC Seminar: "Efficiency from User-driven Service Order Adjustments in Collaborative Consumption of Supply in Transportation" - R. "Jay" Jayakrishnan

Northwestern University Transportation Center presents:

"Efficiency from User-driven Service Order Adjustments in Collaborative Consumption of Supply in Transportation"

R. "Jay" Jayakrishnan
Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering &; Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California at Irvine

 

ABSTRACT:

Newer technologies and high market penetration of personal communication systems along with the advent of autonomous and connected vehicle systems bring up many new possibilities for different paradigms of operation in transportation systems. Facilitated by significantly more peer-to-peer (P2P) communication, users in the future can consume transportation supply with more complete information on individual heterogeneity in utility satisfaction. Several possibilities exist in such a world of shared economy, with regard to using road and vehicle space in a temporally efficient manner. Breaking the traditional First-Come-First-Served paradigms with P2P monetary exchanges to compensate for utility disparities can improve system and user level efficiency. Car-sharing and ride-sharing are two of the more well-known systems of relevance. Autonomous vehicles bring up another dimension in terms of shared ownership as well. There is also recent research in collaborative negotiated consumption of other elements of transportation supply such as signal timings, and lane space availability. This presentation focuses on the possibilities, and discusses recent research into such mechanisms for signal and lane usage, and ride-matching in shared-ride systems. It also describes the associated pricing and behavioral issues where economic concepts such as envy-freeness are introduced as a basis for such schemes to be user-driven and equitable, without system level mandates.

 

SPEAKER BIO:

Prof. R. Jayakrishnan has been in the faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California at Irvine since 1991, after receiving his doctorate from the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests are in a variety of topics such as Traffic Flow Theory and Simulation, Transportation Systems Analysis, Network Modelling, Decision Theory, Intelligent Transportation Systems and Public Transit Design. Prof. Jayakrishnan has been a member of several professional committees, has served in the editorial committees of journals such as the ASCE Journal of Transportation Engineering and Transportation Research Part-C, and has served in several committees of the Transportation Research Board. He was a chair of the TRB subcommittee on Route Choice and Spatio-Temporal Processes. A paper co-authored by him received the Pyke Johnson Award for the best paper in planning submitted to the Transportation Research Board in 2009. Twenty doctoral students have graduated under his advice and he has over 100 refereed publications to his credit. He has been a visiting professor at other institutions such as the Ajou University in South Korea and the Amrita University in India.

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

NUTC Seminar: "Dynamic Clustering and Perimeter Control in Large-scale Urban Networks" - Nikolas Geroliminis, EPFL

Northwestern University Transportation Center presents:

"Dynamic Clustering and Perimeter Control in Large-scale Urban Networks"

Nikolas Geroliminis
Associate Professor, Urban Transport Systems Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, EPFL

 

ABSTRACT:

Traffic is a strongly time-variant process and it needs to be studied in the spatiotemporal dimension. Investigating the clustering problem over time help us reveal the hidden information during the process of congestion formation and dissolution. The primary motivation of this seminar is to study the spatiotemporal relation of congested links in large networks, observing congestion propagation from a macroscopic perspective, and finally identifying critical congestion regimes to aid the design of peripheral control strategies and improve mobility. This is not a straightforward task as transport networks despite spatial correlations in congestion are in principle heterogeneous due to road hierarchy and spatial distribution of demand. Thus, it is not always possible to treat congestion as a continuum in space. An example is directional flows towards a city center in the morning peak. The dynamic clustering framework will be capable of replicating how clusters expand or shrink in the process of congestion formation and dissolution. Moreover, it will be able to find new pockets of congestion and merge clusters with similar traffic conditions. In this framework, we will be able to chase where congestion originates and how traffic management systems affect its formation and the time it finishes. To achieve these goals, first we formulate the problem of partitioning networks to a desired number of regions as mixed integer linear optimization. Connectivity of clusters is explicitly enforced by imposing some constraints and the homogeneity of clusters is maximized in the objective function. In the 2nd part of the presentation, different perimeter control strategies are developed based on principles of control theory. The validation of the clustering methodologies and the perimeter control schemes are conducted in various and complex city structures scenarios using data from field experiments and micro-simulations.

 

SPEAKER BIO:

Prof. Nikolas Geroliminis is an Associate Professor at EPFL and the head of the Urban Transport Systems Laboratory (LUTS). Before joining EPFL he was an Assistant Professor on the faculty of the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Minnesota. He has a diploma in Civil Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) and an MSc and Ph.D. in civil engineering from University of California, Berkeley. He also serves as an Associate Editor in Transportation Research part C, Transportation Science and IEEE Transactions on ITS and in the editorial board of Transportation Research, part B, and of many international conferences. His research interests focus primarily on urban transportation systems, traffic flow theory and control, on-demand transport and shared mobility, Optimization and Large Scale Networks. He is a recipient of the ERC Starting Grant “METAFERW: Modeling and controlling traffic congestion and propagation in large-scale urban multimodal networks”

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Technological Institute 2145 Sheridan Road L211 Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

NUTC Industry Workshop: "Making the Customer Happy: Innovation & Best Practices"

 Northwestern University Transportation Center presents:

INDUSTRY TECHNICAL WORKSHOP [FALL 2017]


MAKING THE CUSTOMER HAPPY: INNOVATION &; BEST PRACTICES

Northwestern University Transportation Center (NUTC) and Center for the Commercialization of Innovative Transportation Technology (CCITT) are co-hosting the Fall 2017 Industry Workshop—Making the Customer Happy: Innovation &; Best Practices—on October 18th, to examine and investigate innovations and best practices in customer service, customer experience and customer loyalty in travel and transportation. Speakers from Northwestern University and the industry will engage the audience through case study presentations and a panel discussion.


EVENT CO-CHAIRS:

Hani S. Mahmassani
William A. Patterson Distinguished Professor of Transportation; Director, NUTC

Breton Johnson
Associate Director, NUTC; Director, CCITT


ABOUT NUTC:

Northwestern University Transportation Center (NUTC) is one of the world's leading interdisciplinary education and research institutions, serving industry, government and the public sectors. Founded in 1954 to generate substantive and enduring contributions for the better movement of materials, people, energy, and information, NUTC stands at the forefront of transportation research and education. NUTC brings together academic researchers, students and business affiliates in a joint open exploration of transportation and supply chain operations. NUTC aims to influence national and international transportation policy, management and technological developments, with the goal of making transportation and supply chain operations more productive, efficient, safe, secure, environmentally friendly and socially beneficial.


ABOUT CCITT:

Center for the Commercialization of Innovative Transportation Technology (CCITT) fosters the implementation of innovative technologies for all modes of surface transportation, including but not limited to railways, mass transit, highways and waterways.

 

WORKSHOP SPEAKERS:

Frank Bush
Lead Consultant - Teradata

Tom Collinger
Associate Professor &; Executive Director, Medill IMC Spiegel Digital &; Database
Research Center - Northwestern

Walter Herbst
Charles Deering McCormick Distinguished Clinical Professor; Clinical Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Director, Master of Product Development Program
- Northwestern

Bret Johnson
Associate Director - NUTC

Julius Jung
Entrepreneur &; Consultant

Hani Mahmassani
Director - NUTC

Jodi Navta
Chief Marketing Officer - Coyote Logistics, A UPS Company

Jarvis Schultz
Associate Director, MS in Robotics; Assistant Professor of Instruction,
Department of Mechanical Engineering - Northwestern

Thomas O'Toole
Clinical Professor, Marketing; Senior Fellow, Kellogg School of Management
- Northwestern

 

 

 

 

WORKSHOP AGENDA:

1:30 PM    WELCOME
Hani Mahmassani - Director, NUTC


1:35 PM    OPENING REMARKS
Frank Bush - Analytic Business Consulting Practice Director, Travel &; Transportation, Teradata


1:45 PM    SESSION 1

Owning The End-To-End Customer Experience with Internet-of-Things (IOT)
Julius Jung - Managing Director, FeedbackNow USA

There's a customer engagement eco system. Does it inform you today?
Tom Collinger - Associate Professor &; Executive Director, Medill IMC Spiegel Digital &; Database Research Center, Northwestern

The digital transformation of customer experience in the travel industry
Thomas O'Toole - Clinical Professor of Marketing, Senior Fellow, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern


3:00 PM    NETWORKING BREAK


3:20 PM    SESSION 2

Aspirational Design Drives Consumption
Walter Herbst - Charles Deering McCormick Distinguished Clinical Professor; Director, Master of Product Development Program, Northwestern

Customer, I Hear You! Do You Hear Me?
Jodi Navta - Chief Marketing Officer, Coyote Logistics, A UPS Company


4:00 PM    PANEL DISCUSSION

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: James L Allen Center 2169 Campus Drive McCormick Auditorium Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

NUTC Leon Moses Lecture: "Outlook for the US Economy: Is this as good as it gets?" - Martin Eichenbaum, Northwestern

Northwestern University Transportation Center presents:

THE 2017 LEON N. MOSES TRANSPORTATION LECTURE:

"Outlook for the US Economy: Is this as good as it gets?"

Martin Eichenbaum

Charles Moskos Professor Of Economics, Northwestern
Co-Director, Center For International Macroeconomics

 

**REGISTRATION REQUIRED**

 

ABOUT FEATURED SPEAKER

Martin Eichenbaum is the Charles Moskos Professor of economics at Northwestern University and the co-director of the Center for International Economics at Northwestern University. He has been at Northwestern University since 1988. He has also taught at the University of Chicago and the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.

Eichenbaum earned his PhD in economics from the University of Minnesota. He served as the co-editor of the American Economic Review from 2011-2015 and is currently the co-editor of the NBER Macro Annual. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the Econometric Society, and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is currently a consultant to the Federal Reserve Banks of Atlanta and San Francisco. In addition he serves on the advisory council of the Global Markets Institute at, Goldman Sachs and the academic advisory council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Finally, he is on the Board of Directors of the Bank of Montreal.

 

ABOUT LEON N. MOSES

Leon N. Moses started at Northwestern University in 1959 as an Associate Professor of Economics. In 1993, he was appointed the Robert E. and Emily King Professor of Business Institutions, after serving as Professor of Economics with a joint appointment to the Northwestern University Transportation Center (NUTC) since 1963. Moses retired as an Emeritus Professor in 2005. His work focused primarily on the economics of firm location and the critical roles of transport and transportation costs.

In his earlier years, Moses served in the armed forces and was discharged in 1945. He started at Ohio State University majoring in agriculture, but later switched to economics and graduated in 1947 with honors. He further pursued economics at Harvard University where he earned an MA in 1950 and PhD in 1955. After receiving his doctorate, Moses became an Assistant Professor at Harvard.

At Northwestern, Moses served as Chair of the Economics Department, and held a joint appointment at the J. L. Kellogg School of Management. Over the years, he reportedly served on nearly every university committee available.

At NUTC, Moses held a number of positions, including Director of Research and Director of Education. From 1976 to 1980, he served as NUTC's Director. Under the leadership of Moses, NUTC gained national recognition particularly for conferences focused on transportation deregulation prospects.

Leon N. Moses passed away on Saturday, October 12, 2013 at the age of 88.

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: James L Allen Center 2169 Campus Drive McCormick Foundation Auditorium Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, October 26, 2017

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

NUTC Seminar: "The Marginal Congestion of a Taxi in New York City" - Alejandro Molnar, Vanderbilt University

Northwestern University Transportation Center presents:

"The Marginal Congestion of a Taxi in New York City"

Alejandro Molnar
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Vanderbilt University

 

ABSTRACT:

We exploit the introduction of a new class of restricted taxi medallion in New York City to provide a causal estimate of the impact on congestion from the addition of taxis to the city. In August 2013 the City of New York introduced a restricted class of “boro” (or “green”) taxis. Boro taxis provide an equivalent service to that of “yellow” medallion taxis, but are restricted from pickups in Manhattan south of a boundary along East 96th St and West 110th St. We document a large spike in taxi cab activity north of the restriction boundary, driven entirely by entry from boro taxis and partially offset by retrenchment from traditional yellow medallion taxis, which face additional, localized competition. This variation allows us to study the effect of taxi supply on congestion: we construct a database of historical street-
level speed from taxi trip records by isolating the trips that consist of uptown or downtown “runs” along a North-South avenue, and projecting travel time onto street intervals. We find that the roll-out of the boro taxi program caused a localized 8% decrease in traffic speed. We then relate speed changes to taxi supply, by employing satellite and aerial orthoimagery to construct a novel data set of the location of taxis over time and space. We derive an empirical congestion curve between car speed and taxi activity.

[In progress: Additionally, we document a substantial slowdown in traffic speed throughout NYC since 2013, and are applying our estimate to attribute the share of this slowdown that can be explained by app-based rideshare providers.]

 

SPEAKER BIO:

Alejandro Molnar is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on market structure, competition and regulation in transportation and ecommerce industries. His dissertation research was on airline incentives in scheduling and a resulting "tragedy of the commons" outcome in the allocation of runway capacity at US airports. He received his PhD in Economics from Stanford University, and undergraduate degree from the Universidad de Buenos Aires.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/