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Events Calendar

EVENTS IN 2015

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Thursday, January 8, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

WHAT CAN CHOICE MODELLING LEARN FROM BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS AND DOES IT MATTER?"

Speaker:  Stephane Hess, Professor of Choice Modeling, Institute for Transport Studies, University of Leeds, U.K.

Abstract: Mathematical models of choice behaviour are used to understand people's choices across a range of topic areas, with transport being one of the most active fields. Their outputs form a key component in guidance underpinning government and industry decisions on changes to policy, infrastructure developments or the introduction of new services or products. In recent years, there has been a growing trend to seek to improve the behavioural realism of the models, often through bringing in ideas from behavioural economics and mathematical psychology. This presentations gives an overview of a number of key concepts in this area, showing the extent to which existing data supports the notion that the assumption of purely compensatory (and often linear in preferences) decision making is not representative of real world behaviour. The talk then focusses on whether (and how much) this matters for choice modelling research and real world transport planning, and identifies some key priorities for future developments.

Bio:   Stephane Hess is Professor of Choice Modelling in the Institute for Transport Studies at the University of Leeds. He is also Honorary Professor in Choice Modelling in the Institute for Transport and Logistics Studies at the University of Sydney, and affiliated Professor in Demand Analysis at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm.

His main research interests lie in the use of advanced discrete choice models for the analysis of travel behaviour, primarily with the use of stated preference data. Here, Hess has made contributions to the state of the art in the specification, estimation and interpretation of such models, notably in a valuation of travel time savings context, while also publishing widely on the benefits of advanced structures in actual large-scale transport analyses.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center, Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, January 22, 2015

12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Metra and Chicago -- Making A Difference in Chicago

Transportation Center Rail Group (Sandhouse Gang) Meeting

Speakers: 

DONALD A. ORSENO,   Executive Director, Metra   and   BILL THOMPSON, CREATE Railroad Program Manager, Association of American Railroads

 Metra and CREATE move forward with ambitious plans for the future.  In October 2014 the Metra Board of Directors approved the first long-term capital plan in Metra's 30-year history. Metra, Amtrak and Norfolk Southern celebrated the grand opening of the Englewood Flyover in October. CREATE announced the availability of the Final Environmental Impact Study for the 75th Street Corridor Improvement Project. This $1 billion plus project that will address a major rail congestion point in Chicago will have a significant impact on freight and Metra and Amtrak fluidity in Chicago.  Don Orseno, Metra's CEO and Bill Thompson, AAR's Vice President in charge of CREATE will address these and other issues and answer questions on the future direction of Metra and CREATE. 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Metra Headquarters, 547 W. Jackson Blvd, 13th fl Chicago

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Flexible Transit for Low-Density Communities

Transportation Seminar

SpeakerCharlotte Frei, PhD Candidate, Transportation Systems Analysis &; Planning, Civil &; Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University

Abstract: Demand for transport in low-density areas can be highly variable over time, and quality (or absence) of transit service may reinforce existing mode choices among travelers. Transit services that can flex with demand have been explored to address this variation. This paper describes a method to identify bus stop locations for a flexible service with characteristics of both fixed-route and demand-responsive transit. Once stops are identified, vehicle tours using actual origin-destination demand are constructed to evaluate relative operational efficiency. Simulations for a case study area in metropolitan Denver, Colorado and demand estimation results will be presented.  The methodology is appropriate to determine checkpoint locations and evaluate fleet allocation to structure flexible. The method can be extended to evaluate design of flexible transit in other low-density area; such future extensions will be discussed, particularly in the context of evolving vehicle technology and customer service expectations.

 Bio:   Charlotte Frei is a PhD Candidate in Transportation Systems Analysis and Planning at Northwestern University. Her research interests include travel behavior and public transit, with emphasis on topics related to transit mode choice. Charlotte earned a BS in Civil Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - lower level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Developing an Integrated Transportation Infrastructure Decision Support Platform

Speaker:   Meead Saberi, Assistant Professor, Transportation Group, Monash University (Australia)  NU PhD 2013 (CEE)

Abstract
This presentation introduces an integrated transportation infrastructure decision support platform which is being developed at Monash University, Australia. The vision is to develop a fully integrated system that integrates with real-time data, takes advantage of big data and various ICT technologies, and provides a fully connected modeling environment. The presentation focuses on interactive visualization of big and open data as a key component of the decision support platform. Several interactive data visualizations on population, socio-demographic, and safety characteristics of Melbourne will be presented.

 BIO:  Dr. Meead Saberi received his PhD degree (2013) in Transportation Systems Analysis and Planning from Northwestern University, USA. He also holds a Master's degree (2010) in Transportation Engineering from Portland State University, USA and a Bachelor's degree (2008) in Civil Engineering from Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. The focus of his PhD dissertation was on understanding the properties and dynamics of large-scale urban network traffic flow. Viewing urban travel demand from a macroscopic perspective, he demonstrated that urban transportation networks behave similar to many other aggregated dynamical physical systems. In 2013, he was appointed as a "Young Member" of the Traffic Flow Theory and Characteristics Committee (AHB45) of the Transportation Research Board of the USA National Academies. In 2014, he joined the Transport group at Monash University. He is leading the City Science Research Group focusing on improving scientific understanding of cities.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, January 29, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

An efficient data-driven approach to static and dynamic ambulance location for emergency medical srv

Speaker:   Lavanya Marla, Asst. Professor, Industrial &; Enterprise Systems Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Abstract:   We present an efficient, data-driven computational approach to ambulance deployment for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems. Central to our approach is the use of simulation to accurately determine the impact of ambulance deployments to a given distribution of emergency requests. Our simulator allows us to directly measure a wide range of metrics (e.g., the number of requests serviced within 15 minutes, or the opportunity cost of abandonment) while accounting for complex interdependencies (e.g., from overlapping requests). It also allows the capture of non-stationary or transient effects that cannot be captured easily using analytical models.

Leveraging our simulator, we present a computational approach to ambulance fleet allocation and dynamic redeployment, where the goal is to position ambulances to bases to maximize the systems service level. Despite the combinatorial complexity, we show that a simple and efficient greedy algorithm produces good solutions, and can be repeatedly employed in real-time for dynamic repositioning. We derive data-driven performance guarantees with provably small optimality gap for our approach in practical settings. Our data-driven analysis is general and can be applied to range of simulators that exhibit more (or less) realism than the simulator employed in our empirical evaluations { the key requirement is the ability to efficiently compute the behavior of an omniscient policy with perfect information regarding future requests. We conduct simulation experiments based on real usage data of an EMS system from a large Asian city, and demonstrate significant improvement in the system's service levels using static allocations and redeployment policies discovered by our approach.

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Ctr., Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, February 19, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

"Microscopic Simulation and Safety Analysis of Roundabouts"

Speaker: 

Dr. Nezamuddin, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Valparaiso University

Abstract:  Although circular junctions are usually associated with the British, their presence in the United States dates back to at least 1905 when Columbus Circle was built near Central Park in New York. Those early twentieth century circular junctions, called traffic circles, were designed for high-speed entries into the circular area and gave priority to the entering vehicles over the circulating vehicles. That was a recipe for disaster. High crash experience and choked traffic circles meant that circular junctions will never gain ground in the United States again. In the 1960s, the United Kingdom introduced the mandatory yield-at-entry rule at circular junctions, which led to the birth of the modern roundabout. Safety is the hallmark of modern roundabouts and they are popular in certain parts of Europe and Australia. The first modern roundabout in the United States was built in Nevada in 1990 and their number is steadily rising since then: 38 in 1997, more than 2,000 in 2010, and over 3,700 at present. There's still initial resistance from the public, but public attitude toward a roundabout changes favorably after the construction. Hundreds of roundabouts are expected to be built each year in the United States. This study presents a microscopic simulation modeling and safety analysis of the modern roundabouts.

 Bio: Dr. Nezamuddin is an assistant professor of civil engineering at Valparaiso University in northwest Indiana. Prior to joining Valparaiso University in August 2013, he was a research fellow at the Center for Transportation Research at the University of Texas at Austin from 2011 to 2013, where he worked in the areas of dynamic network modeling, traffic operations and microscopic simulation. Currently, he is working on microscopic simulation modeling and safety analysis of roundabouts. Dr. Nezamuddin received a Ph.D. (civil engineering) from the University of Texas at Austin and B.Tech. (civil engineering) from the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi.

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, February 26, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Potholes or Tolls? Perspectives on Transportation Finance

Speaker Dr. Joseph Schofer, Professor of Civil Engineering &; Transportation and Associate Dean, McCormick School of Engineering, Northwestern University

Everyone is talking about the need for more funding for infrastructure – mostly highway infrastructure. In this discussion we will consider the need, how we got here, the options – real and imagined – and how we might address the problem.

Bio: Joseph Schofer is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Associate Dean of the Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University. His research and teaching focus on transportation policy, particularly understanding and supporting decision making for transportation and other infrastructure systems investments and operations, needs for and use of data and information, learning from experience, and the role of transactions in decision making. Schofer is a National Associate of the National Research Council of the National Academies, a life Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Chair of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Data and Information System Section and its Task Forces on Data for Decisions and Performance Measures and Development of Freight Fluidity Performance Measures. He also serves as a member of the Pace Citizen's Advisory Board and the Transportation Committee for the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP). Professor Schofer received the TRB Roy W. Crum Distinguished Service Award in 2011 in recognition of outstanding achievement in transportation research.

Schofer earned his B.E. degree in Civil Engineering from Yale University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in transportation engineering from Northwestern.

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, March 5, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

"Tactical Network Planning for Food Aid Distribution in Kenya"

Speaker:  Marie-Eve Rancourt, Assistant Professor, Department of Management &; Technology, Business School of the University of Quebec in Montreal

 

Abstract:   In Sub-Saharan Africa, annual weather patterns cause recurrent shocks which make the population vulnerable to food insecurity. In some regions, seasonal droughts create regular food shortages that are mitigated through sustained food aid. The objective of this study is to design an effective last-mile food aid distribution network in such a context. It is based on the food aid distribution problem arising in the region of Garissa in Kenya, but the methodology that it introduces is of general applicability. We present a location model to determine a set of distribution centers from which the food is directly distributed to the beneficiaries. Our model considers the welfare of all stakeholders involved in this regional response system: the World Food Programme, the Kenya Red Cross, and the beneficiaries. We describe how need assessment and population data were combined to determine the food distribution requirements. We also show how GIS data describing the road network was used to establish a set of potential distribution centers and to evaluate transportation costs. In addition to the results obtained by solving our primary model, we present variants of the basic covering model and several comparative analyses to illustrate the trade-offs between the objectives of the different stakeholders. Finally, future research directions are presented and discussed.

 Bio:   Marie-Eve Rancourt is an assistant professor of operations management at the Business School of the University of Québec in Montréal since August 2012. She is also affiliated with the Interuniversity Research Center on Enterprise Networks, Logistics and Transportation (CIRRELT), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and a member of the Canadian Research Institute on Humanitarian Crisis and Aid (OCCAH). 

Her research interests are in the areas of transportation system modeling and humanitarian logistics using techniques based on operations research and econometric. The main field applications of her research include network design for food aid distribution, routing and scheduling of long-haul transportation problems, transportation procurement and market analysis in emerging countries. Her recent work has been focussing on logistics issues related with food security in the Horn of Africa. She is working in collaboration with different organisations, such as the World Food Programme, the Kenya Red Cross and the UNICEF to develop analytical methods for planning food aid distribution and provide insight to alleviate access to populations located in insecure areas. She received her Ph.D. in management science from HEC Montreal in 2013; an M.Sc. in modeling and decision support from HEC Montreal in 2007; and a B.Sc. in mathematics form the University of Montreal in 2004.

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center, Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, April 2, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Modeling Driver Behavior in a Connected Environment: Integration of Microscopic Traffic Simulation and Telecommunication Systems"

Speaker:    Alireza Talebpour, PhD Candidate, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University

Abstract   Connected and automated vehicles will change the future of our surface transportation system. Connected Vehicles Technology (CVT) provides the opportunity to create an interconnected network of moving vehicular units and stationary infrastructure units, in which individual vehicles can communicate with other vehicles (i.e. Vehicle-to-Vehicle communications) and other agents (e.g. a centralized traffic management center through Vehicle-to-Infrastructure communications) in a collaborative and meaningful manner. The real-time information provided by CVT allows drivers to become more aware of their surrounding traffic condition and to maneuver safely and more efficiently. Furthermore, in comparison with on-board sensing technologies, which provide the necessary information to myopically operate automated vehicles, CVT can improve the efficiency and reliability of the system-level performance of a driver-less transportation network. This presentation will introduce a comprehensive simulation framework to model driver behavior in a connected driving environment with connected and automated vehicles. The framework, which consists of a microscopic traffic simulator integrated with a discrete-event wireless communications network simulator, forms a basis for exploring the properties of the resulting traffic systems, and for assessing system-level impacts of these technologies. Special focus will be made on the effects of connected and automated vehicles on the stability of traffic flow, as well as the effectiveness of speed harmonization systems in controlling breakdown formation, preventing speed drop, maintaining higher flow rates, and reducing emissions.

 Bio   Alireza Talebpour is a PhD Candidate in Transportation Systems Analysis and Planning at Northwestern University. He specializes in traffic flow theory and safety analysis, with emphasis on topics related to connected and automated vehicles. Alireza received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Sharif University of Technology.

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - Lower level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, April 16, 2015

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Civil War Railroads -

The Sandhouse Gang (Rail Interest Group) of the Transportation Center presents:

John (Jack) Barriger, Retired Railroad Executive will deliver a talk on Civil War Railroads

The Civil War was the first major conflict in which railroads played an important role.

Men and supplies were moved quickly over long distances without foraging for themselves and their animals which revolutionized military strategy. Important battles were fought to control rail lines and junctions. The War brought about substantial improvements in railroading and trained the men who built America's post-Civil War national railroad network.

 Bio:   Jack Barriger is a third generation railroader and the great grandson of a Civil War Officer. After graduating from MIT and Yale Graduate School of Transportation Economics,  he began a 36-year career with the Santa Fe Railway. During the first 18 years, he served as Trainmaster in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California, and as Superintendent of Transportation at Chicago headquarters.  For the next two years he managed the Transportation Control Systems Division of Sylvania Electric Products at Waltham, MA. For his last 18 year at Santa Fe he served in several positions in the Executive Department including Assistant to Chairman and President. After retiring from Santa Fe, Jack did Transportation Consulting for R. L. Banks Associates, PTSI and several railroads. He remains active in railroad affairs as a Trustee of the  John W. Barriger III National Railroad Library in St. Louis, which he founded in 1984, and as a member of AREMA, AARS, AAPRCO, IAROO and MofW Club of Chicago. 

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Monday, April 20, 2015

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Workshop: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Applications and Emergent Technologies

This technical workshop will discuss the current and future potential of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), commonly known as "drones." Speakers will provide insight into infrastructure monitoring and inspection, package and cargo delivery, the evolution of the UAV market, and policy developments.

Confirmed Speakers:

Joe Burns, CEO, Sensurion Aerospace 
Michael E. Drobac,  Executive Director, Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Coalition (Senior Policy Advisor, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer &; Feld LLP)
Sean McCann, President, MMIST Inc.

Registration Required.  Event is Free

To Register go to:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/unmanned-aerial-vehicles-applications-and-emergent-technologies-tickets-16490593810

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: James L Allen Center 2169 Campus Drive McCormick Foundation Auditorium Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/industr...

7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Doug Parker, CEO of American Airlines - featured speaker: 2015 Patterson Transportation Lecture

34th Annual Wm. A. Patterson Transportation Lecture will feature the CEO of the world's largest airlines - Doug Parker

Speaker Profile:

W. Douglas Parker is chairman and chief executive officer of American Airlines Group and American Airlines, its principal subsidiary company. Parker became CEO following the merger of US Airways and American Airlines in 2013.Previously, Parker was chairman and CEO of US Airways. Prior to the merger of US Airways and America West Airlines in 2005, he was chairman, president, and chief executive officer of America West. Parker became the CEO at America West just ten days before September 11, 2001, and led the carrier through the crisis.

Under Parker's leadership, US Airways achieved record revenue growth, operational performance, and profit margins that outpaced most industry peers. Parker has been one of the most vocal proponents of airline industry consolidation, which has provided a more stable and competitive industry for employees, customers, communities, and stockholders.

Parker's experience prior to joining America West in 1995 includes four years with Northwest Airlines as vice president and assistant treasurer, and vice president of financial planning and analysis. From 1986 to 1991, he held a number of financial management positions with American Airlines.

Parker received a bachelor of arts degree in economics from Albion College in 1984 and a master of business administration degree from Vanderbilt University in 1986. He serves on the board of directors for Valley of the Sun United Way.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Donald P. Jacobs Center 2001 Sheridan Road OLC Forum Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/news_ev...

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

7:30 AM - 1:30 PM

Transportation Center Business Advisory Council Meeting

The Spring meeting of the Transportation Center's Business Advisory Commmittee

Closed meeting - open only to BAC members and other invited guests.

Contact Info: Diana F Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/industr...

Thursday, April 23, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Transportation Seminar: Place Perception, Attractiveness, Meaning & Relationship to Activity & Travel

Speaker:    Konstadinos G. Goulias, Professor of Transportation,                             Geography Dept.,  University of California, Santa Barbara

Abstract:  Spatial choice models are increasingly becoming the focus of research for transportation applications.  Adding components of attitudes and perceptions to spatial discrete choice models allows building simulated agents that are more realistically heterogeneous.  One latent construct that can be quantified using attitudinal analysis and used in discrete choice models is Sense of Place (SOP) that we can define as a person's affective ties with the material environment.  Attitudinal analysis of SOP treats it as a multi-dimensional construct that includes place identity that is a person's identity with relation to the physical environment, place attachment that is the positive bond that develops between a person and the environment, place dependence that is defined as the strength of association between a person and a place, and a set of more focused attitudes that are application specific.  In this presentation we will explore SOP and its measurement in different contexts and different scales to also show its relationship to activity participation and travel.  The presentation will also illustrate a few related ideas in place familiarity, perception of opportunities available, perception of dangerous places, and attractiveness for the entire South Santa Barbara County and their relationship with objectively measured spatial attributes such as network centrality, number of business opportunities for activity participation, and remotely sensed land uses.  The final portion of the presentation is dedicated to the relationship between SOP and subjective well-being. 

 

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Ford Motor Company Engineering Design Center 2133 Sheridan Road ITW Room 1350 Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, May 7, 2015

3:15 PM - 5:00 PM

Rail Group Mtg: Market Development - Pre & Post Staggers

Sandhouse Gang Meeting (Rail Interest Group)

Speaker Gene Harmon, Transportation &; Logistics Expert

America's railroads have many tools available to produce profitability and thus fund new investment and returns for investors.  These tools were restricted prior to the Staggers Act.  The entire American rail industry was heading to oblivion as unplanned and accelerating disinvestment corroded the railways infrastructure and thus the ability to produce earnings.  With the Staggers Rail Act management had new tools to better serve customers.

 This presentation describes two strategic initiatives Gene Harmon led at the ICG pre-Staggers and at the SP post-Staggers.  The ICG was in severe decline by the early 1970s.  Profits had evaporated, track and equipment maintenance were severely restricted and ICG was struggling to compete with barge and highway competitors.  Harmon became Market Manager-Paper in late 1974 after a revolution approved by Paul Reistrup led to the formation of an integrated market development and pricing organization.  He will describe how they formed a team to address serious service and car supply issues with our paper customers then transformed the financial results of the 3000 car paper fleet.  Then, he will put these developments into the context of ICG's financial results.  In spite of not having the flexibility allowed by Staggers the team was able on a small scale to show what could be done to better serve customers and improve financial results.  It took Harry Bruce, Rick Bessette and the ICG management team post-Staggers to realize the true benefits of relaxed economic regulation.

 In 1978 Harmon joined the Southern Pacific under Pete Vajta who had been charged with instituting Marketing at SP.  Carload business was deregulated in 1980 and the SP began a series of very specific steps to address Crown-Zellerbach's (CZ) supply chain opportunities.  What resulted was a complete restructuring of CZ's west coast distribution built around SP and not Interstate 5.  SP had the ability to contract with CZ for specific business with complete flexibility to price to the market.  The program both reduced costs and dramatically improved SP's competitive position.  These innovations cut costs for CZ and allowed them to compete for new business.   SP would have needed about 100 similar programs annually to permit a major financial turn-around and alas this was not to be.

 The presentation looks at the overall financial performance of both the ICG and SP pre and post-Staggers.  In addition, notable personalities such as Paul Reistrup, Doug Hagestad, Harry Bruce, Dave DeBoer and Rob Krebs were actively involved in these programs.  There will be some personal reminiscences to enliven the presentation.

Gene Harmon -Biography

 Gene Harmon recently retired from a 44 year career in transportation and logistics management.  Between 1985 and 2013 he owned and operated a logistics management and consulting business.

 Gene has worked on the restructuring of Safeway Stores and the State Railway of Thailand, and led the turn-around of a moribund freight brokerage firm.  He led the installation of a Quality System for a logistics company and provided management consulting services for a wide variety of transportation clients.  In 2000 he secured start-up capital and led the implementation of Speedlink, a total logistics freight service combining rail and truck services using unit trains of box cars between Portland, OR and Los Angeles which were integrated with cross-docks and trucks for pick-up and delivery.   

 Gene had summer jobs with the AAR and Erie Lackawanna during college.  After graduation, Gene joined with the Illinois Central Gulf Railroad in Chicago during the Paul Reistrup era.  At the ICG, he managed the turnaround in profitability of the $90 million paper and fiber business.  Moving to the Southern Pacific Transportation Company he managed the $200 million paper business segment. At the SP, he conceived then implemented a major logistics service with Crown Zellerbach.  Today's presentation describes these two railroads and two of the strategic market development programs he implemented both pre and post Staggers.

 Mr. Harmon has a BA in History from Lake Forest College, has taught logistics at the California Maritime Academy and LSU/MSU Logging School and worked with numerous interns seeking real world business experience as part of their MBA graduate work at UC Berkeley.

 He travels extensively around the world, enjoys hiking, working out, reading, model building and photography.  Mr. Harmon is active in a non-profit organization serving northern California.

 

 

 

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Donald P. Jacobs Center 2001 Sheridan Road Room 276 Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Uncertainty in Hazardous Materials Transportation

Speaker:  Changhyun Kwon, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Industrial &; Systems Engineering,  University at Buffalo, SUNY

Abstract: This talk addresses various types of uncertainty in hazardous materials (hazmat) transportation. First, we discuss advanced routing methods to mitigate the uncertain risk of hazmat accidents and to avoid catastrophic consequences. In particular, value-at-risk (VaR) and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) concepts are applied to truck transportation of hazmat. VaR and CVaR offer more flexible and computable schemes.

Second, we discuss data uncertainty in measuring the risk of transporting hazmat. The two important data types in hazmat transportation are accident probabilities and accident consequences, both of which are subject to many ambiguous factors. In addition, historical data are usually insufficient to construct probability distributions of accident probabilities and consequences. This motivates a new robust optimization approach to consider the robust shortest path and the Worst-case CVaR (WCVaR).

Third, we discuss uncertainty in the behavior of hazmat truck drivers. In the current literature, most, if not all, hazmat network design problems assume drivers' perfectly rational route decision making; that is, drivers will always choose the very shortest path available. However, recent research indicates that drivers often are not perfectly rational. Rather, drivers are usually boundedly rational such that they choose routes whose length is comparable with the shortest path length within a certain threshold. We discuss a generalized mathematical framework to address various boundedly rational behaviors of drivers in the context of hazmat transportation network design.

 Bio: Changhyun Kwon is currently an Assistant Professor in Industrial &; Systems Engineering at the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York. His research interests include transportation systems analysis and service operations problems. His research has been supported by various organizations including the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Transportation, and Canadian Embassy. He received a PhD in Industrial Engineering in 2008 and an M.S. in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research in 2005, both from the Pennsylvania State University. He also received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from KAIST in 2000. He received an NSF CAREER award in 2014.

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - lower level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, May 14, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Green Urban Freight Strategies in the New Mobility Era

Speaker   Dr. Jie (Jane) Lin, Associate Professor, Civil and Materials Engineering; and Research Associate Professor, Institute for Environmental Science &; Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago

Abstract The rapid advances in wireless communication and ubiquitous mobile is changing the way people and goods move in the new mobility era.  I define "new mobility" as having the following features: (1) utilizing wireless communication and mobile computing, (2) real-time response to demand, and (3) resource (e.g., capacity, facility, and information) sharing. Specific to urban freight, one important driving force for increasing volumes of goods and demand for expedited delivery time and reliability by consumers is the fast growing e-commerce industry. On the other hand, environmental and energy concerns are taking center stage in transportation planning, policy making and way of doing business. For example, highway trucks and other heavy vehicles account for 33% of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and 23.3% of PM10 emissions from all transportation sources. In addition, freight transport accounts for 74% of total transportation energy consumption and fuel cost contributes 39% of the operating cost for the trucking industry (The truckers report 2013). In my talk I'll present two potential green urban freight strategies drawn from my past and ongoing research: urban consolidation center (UCC) and dynamic en-route cargo consolidation. Some of the research questions are "Is UCC the way to go?", "Is Google Express or Uber-like crowdsourced delivery the future of urban goods delivery?". I'll share my thoughts from the energy and environmental point of view.

 Biography   Dr. Lin is an associate Professor of Department of Civil and Materials Engineering and holds a joint appointment with the Institute for Environmental Science and Policy (IESP) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Her research is focused on modeling of transportation environmental impacts, freight transportation and logistics, and intelligent transportation systems (ITS).  Dr. Lin is Chair of the Transportation and Air Quality Committee (ADC20) of the Transportation Research Board, National Research Council of the National Academies (2011-2017).  She serves on the editorial boards of Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice (2008-present) and the International Journal of Sustainable Transportation (2011-present). Dr. received her MS and PhD degrees from University of California, Davis, and BS from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. She was a post-doctoral fellow at the Harvard University Center for the Environment, Cambridge, MA between 2002-2003.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Lower Level - Ruan Conference Center Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, May 28, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Transportation Seminar: Connected Cars - Lifestyle Delivery

Speaker:     Dr. Sania Irwin, Head of Systems &; Applications, Chief Technology Office, Nokia Networks

Abstract: The world is quickly evolving into the “Connected Everything Society” – from intelligent cars to smart homes to health and wellness solutions. Amongst the various Internet of Things (IoT) verticals, automotive brings unique challenges by significantly increasing the number of high bandwidth high mobility connections. At the same time it opens up a realm of possibilities. We are in an unique position to leverage the deep knowledge of the wireless infrastructure and the applications it carries, with precision mapping and road traffic technologies, to create new experiences not otherwise possible. We have generated a suite of “Lifestyle Delivery” use cases which aim to make the world safer, greener, smoother, and more enjoyable. We look forward to sharing these ideas with you, and learning more about how you see the world changing.

 Bio:  Sania Irwin established and heads up the Systems &; Applications organization in the Chief Technology Office (CTO) at Nokia Networks, focused on generating the vision, the blueprint, and the collaterals to transform today's society to the intelligently connected world of the future (e.g., through Smart Cars, Smart Homes, Smart Cities …). The entity creates cutting edge products and solutions for the wireless market (e.g., in the space of Internet of Things (IoT), Over The Top (OTT) Applications, Self Organizing Networks, Wireless Experience Management, Smart Analytics and Machine Learning, etc.). She has set up Technology Labs where these industry leading solutions are prototyped and showcased – generating customer mindshare, demonstrating thought leadership, and accelerating the pace of innovation. Previously she led the Systems Engineering unit at Motorola Networks, charged with delivering product architectures and specifications, as well as network planning and optimization solutions for its UMTS offerings. She has spearheaded the creation of technology portfolio aligned with business strategy. Prior to working in the Telecommunications industry, Sania guided Operations Research efforts at General Motors Corporation, and championed solutions in the Information Technology domain at Xerox Corporation. She earned her Bachelor's degree in Computer Science and Mathematics from University of Rochester, and her Master's and PhD degrees focused on Wireless Communications and Operations Research from Northwestern University.

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Lower Level - Ruan Conference Center Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Monday, June 15, 2015

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Freight Transportation & Logistics Executive Program: Securing Capacity in a Dynamic Industry

In the current business environment operators and their customers are experiencing a capacity constrained global market and rising cost structures.  In this dynamic situation, freight transportation and logistics decisions must be managed with regard to pricing, service, access, mode selection, and contractual arrangements.  Strategies for success for both the transportation buyers and sellers must continually adapt in this changing landscape.

To address these challenges, the Northwestern University Transportation Center has developed a customized program for transportation and logistics executives and those who invest, raise capital, and provide services for the sector.  This executive program will provide insight into the rapidly changing domestic and international transportation industry, including air, rail, truck, marine, package, third party logistics, and other non-asset sectors such as brokerage.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/industr...

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Freight Transportation & Logistics Executive Program: Securing Capacity in a Dynamic Industry

In the current business environment operators and their customers are experiencing a capacity constrained global market and rising cost structures.  In this dynamic situation, freight transportation and logistics decisions must be managed with regard to pricing, service, access, mode selection, and contractual arrangements.  Strategies for success for both the transportation buyers and sellers must continually adapt in this changing landscape.

To address these challenges, the Northwestern University Transportation Center has developed a customized program for transportation and logistics executives and those who invest, raise capital, and provide services for the sector.  This executive program will provide insight into the rapidly changing domestic and international transportation industry, including air, rail, truck, marine, package, third party logistics, and other non-asset sectors such as brokerage.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/industr...

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Freight Transportation & Logistics Executive Program: Securing Capacity in a Dynamic Industry

In the current business environment operators and their customers are experiencing a capacity constrained global market and rising cost structures.  In this dynamic situation, freight transportation and logistics decisions must be managed with regard to pricing, service, access, mode selection, and contractual arrangements.  Strategies for success for both the transportation buyers and sellers must continually adapt in this changing landscape.

To address these challenges, the Northwestern University Transportation Center has developed a customized program for transportation and logistics executives and those who invest, raise capital, and provide services for the sector.  This executive program will provide insight into the rapidly changing domestic and international transportation industry, including air, rail, truck, marine, package, third party logistics, and other non-asset sectors such as brokerage.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/industr...

Monday, June 22, 2015

8:00 AM - 5:15 PM

7th William O. Lipinski Symposium on Transportation Policy & Strategy

"Paths to Economic Competitiveness:  Advancing Supply Chain Performance in the Chicago Hub"

 

The William O. Lipinski Symposium on Transportation Policy &; Strategy is a working conference that explores transportation and infrastructure problems facing the nation today and discusses new ways to plan, manage, and finance solutions for the 21st Century. The Symposium acts as a forum to connect decision-makers with transportation experts from all over the country and to build a consensus on policies for state and federal action now and in the future.

The 2015 Lipinski Symposium will explore the role of intermodal supply chain operations for promoting economic development and competitiveness in the Chicago hub, for the purpose of identifying values, obstacles, opportunities, and priorities for advancing freight mobility in the region and the nation.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: James L Allen Center 2169 Campus Drive Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/news_ev...

Thursday, June 25, 2015

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

"Restricting Signals Ahead: State of the Rail Indusry in 2015"

Transportation Center Sandhouse Gang (Rail Interest Group) presents...

Ed Ellis, President, Iowa Pacific Holdings

A thought-provoking, discussion-generating conversation with Ed Ellis, President, Iowa Pacific Holdings, on the challenges facing the railroad industry in the days ahead.  Ed will cover some of the key issues facing the industry today, including dangers to the national network, key capex issues including PTC, and potential solutions. 

 Bio:   Railroader, traveler and writer Ed Ellis was born and raised in Paducah, Kentucky.  He worked his way through college as a brakeman and switchman on the Illinois Central Gulf Railroad, and graduated from the University of Tennessee with a Transportation degree in 1976.

 He joined the management team of Chicago and North Western at a time when CNW was fighting for its survival in competition with the Rock Island and Milwaukee Road, against a backdrop of deregulation brought on by the4R and Stagger Acts.  As Assistant to the Senior VP Traffic, Mr. Ellis participated in formulating CNW's strategy on deregulation, particularly with respect to development of confidential contract rates, where CNW was the industry leader.  As Manager of Equipment Planning, he oversaw a dramatic increase in fleet size, including acquisition of grain-covered hoppers and a substantial portion of the Rock Island's car fleet, when that carrier was liquidated.

 In 1983 Mr. Ellis led the formation of a shortline group called Chicago West Pullman and was a key part of the company's growth to eight properties in eight years, during which time he was also involved in direct management of the largest railroad in the group.

 In 1992 he joined RailTex, the largest feeder railroad company.  In 1993 he won the Distinguished Marketing Achievement award from Railway Age magazine for developing and implementing a rail-based small shipment program.

 In September 1996, Mr. Ellis joined Amtrak and became Vice President, Mail and Express where it was his responsibility to grow Amtrak's mail and express traffic.  During his five years at Amtrak, revenue grew from $44 million to over $120 million.

 In 2001, Mr. Ellis led the formation of Iowa Pacific, with the goal of developing a portfolio of freight and passenger railroads and rail-related businesses.  Today, Iowa Pacific operates nine railroads in the US and three in the UK, and features a host of ancillary businesses including locomotive and car leasing, track maintenance, passenger and private railcar operations.  Iowa Pacific's 2014 revenues exceeded $80 million.

 Mr. Ellis has served as a columnist for Trains Magazine, and hosts acoustic concerts at a mountaintop venue on IPH's Rio Grande Scenic Railroad in Colorado.  He and his wife Peggy live in the Chicago area and Southern Colorado.  They have three children.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

5:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Transportation Center Welcome Back Reception

The Transportation Center invites its New and Continuing students, faculty, staff, colleagues and friends to join us as we kick off the new academic term with a great Welcome Back event at the Stadium Club at Ryan Field.

Meet our new transportation students, re-connect with continuing students and faculty.   Spouses, significant others and children are invited to join the fun.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Ryan Field 1501 Central Street Stadium Club - Gate "P" Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, October 1, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

"The Digitally Connected Commuter: Is Growing Reliance on Personal Electronic Devices Increasing the Demand for Public Transit?"

 Seminar Speaker:  Joseph P. Schwieterman, Professor and Director, Chaddick Institute for Metropolitan Development DePaul University

Abstract

This presentation reviews newly-collected data about the growing dependence on  personal electronic devices  (PEDs) among commuter rail travelers in the Chicago region.  Drawing upon DePaul's Technology in Travel project, it explores whether the growing importance of these devices to travelers is stimulating the demand for rail transit.  The report compares observation of 4,700 passengers at randomly chosen points on 45 Metra trains in early 2015 with more than 14,000 observations between 2010 and 2014.   The results show that more than three times as many riders are engaged in electronic tasks that are illegal while driving—such as reading emails on phones—than five years ago.   Schwieterman postulates that the value of travel time made possible by PEDs helps explain some of the recent ridership increases in the wake of significant fare increases

 Bio: Joseph P. Schwieterman, PhD, a professor in the School of Public Service at DePaul University and director of the school's Chaddick Institute for Metropolitan Development, is a noted authority on transportation, and a long–standing contributor to the Transportation Research Board. He holds an M.S. in Transportation from Northwestern University and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.  Schwieterman spent eight years working in yield management for United Airlines and is president of the Chicago chapter of the Transportation Research Forum.  

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, October 8, 2015

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Estimation of Airline Initnerary Choice Models Using Deisaggregate Ticket Data

Seminar Speaker Laurie Garrow, Associate Professor of Transportation Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

Airline itinerary choice models support many multi-million dollar decisions, e.g., they are used to evaluate potential route schedules and inform aircraft purchase decisions. Classic itinerary choice models suffer from major limitations, most notably they use average fare information but to not correct for price endogeneity. In 2013, Dr. Garrow established the first (and to date only) academic partnership with the Airlines Reporting Corporation. Through this partnership, she has access to six years of ticketing data for U.S. carriers. We use this database of airline tickets to estimate itinerary choice and compare these to classic itinerary choice models that use aggregate fare information but correct for price endogeneity. We describe how we plan to extend our approach to evaluate consumer welfare impacts of recent U.S. airline mergers.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - lower level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, October 15, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Neglected Impact of Measurement Error on Disaggregate Transportation Demand Models"

 Seminar Speaker: David Brownstone, Professor of Economics, Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Irvine

Abstract:  Econometricians have known for almost a century that using variables subject to measurement errors in regression models always biases inference and frequently leads to inconsistent estimation.  Nevertheless disaggregate transportation modelers frequently use variables with substantial measurement error.  Route choice, mode choice, and vehicle choice models all require information about non-chosen alternatives, and these data are frequently imputed (e.g. from network skims) with substantial error.  This talk reviews work in economics on measurement error in income (a common exogenous variable in transportation models), and then gives some results from attempts to model the measurement process in route choice and vehicle choice.

Bio: David Brownstone is Professor of Economics at the University of California, Irvine, and he is also a member of UCI's Institute of Transportation Studies and Institute of Mathematical Behavioral Sciences.  Before coming to UCI in 1984, Brownstone taught economics at Princeton University and the Stockholm School of Economics in Sweden.  Professor Brownstone has studied the impacts of tax reform on housing demand, the impacts of measurement errors in economic surveys, the impacts of carpool lanes and road pricing, the impacts of urban form on household vehicle choice and utilization, and the demand for alternative-fueled vehicles.  His current research is using new detailed data to build a new model to analyze the impacts of the recently increased Federal light vehicle fuel economy standards. Professor Brownstone has served as an expert consultant for toll road, high speed rail, and other major transportation projects in Orange County, California, Australia, and The Netherlands. He has recently consulted with the Volpe Center and the California Energy Commission on vehicle demand modeling.  In addition to his applied work, Brownstone was one of the first econometricians to apply bootstrapping and multiple imputations to generate valid inferences in complex models.  Together with Kenneth Train and David Bunch he was one of the first to apply mixed logit models in household vehicle demand and transportation mode choice models.  Brownstone has published many articles in top economics and transportation journals, and he currently serves on the editorial boards of Transportation Research (Part B: Methodological), Economics of Transportation, and The Journal of Choice Modeling.   

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, October 22, 2015

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Forecasting Urban Travel: Past, Present and Future - Book Launch Symposium

The Northwestern Transportation Center is pleased to announce and celebrate the publication of

"Forecasting Urban Travel: Past, Present and Future"  the new book by

David Boyce, Professor Emeritus of Transportation and Regional Science, University of Illinois at Chicago  

&; Huw Williams, Emeritus Professor of Transport and Spatial Analysis, Cardiff University

This special event will include a presentation by the authors followed by a panel discussion featuring the following distinguished transportation experts: 

Anna Nagurney, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Ram Pendyala, Georgia Institute of Technology

Kermit Wies, Former Deputy Executive Director, Chicago Metropolital Agency for Planning (CMAP)

 Reception to follow at 4:30 pm

REGISTRATION REQUIRED

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: University Library 1970 Campus Drive VerSteeg Faculty Lounge, 3rd fl, South Tower Evanston IL 6

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/news_ev...

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

The Internet of Things in Transportation and Logistics

This technical workshop, held in conjunction with the Fall 2015 meeting of the NUTC Business Advisory Council, will discuss the current applications of the Internet of Things (IoT) in transportation and logistics settings. IoT describes a network of physical and mobile objects or “things” embedded with electronics, software, sensors, and network connectivity. In a transportation system, dynamic interaction between these “things” enables vehicular communication, smart traffic control, logistics and fleet management and optimization, intelligent port operations, vehicle control, and energy, maintenance and safety management, among others. The workshop features speakers from transportation firms, internet infrastructure companies, and technology providers for the transportation industry, and will describe applications in trucking, rail, and port operations, and more.

Contact Info: Bret Johnson

Location: 1710 Orrington Avenue Evanston IL 60201

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/industr...

Thursday, November 5, 2015

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

How to Fundraise for Operational Expenditures in International Humanitarian Aid"

Seminar SpeakerDr. Maria Besiou, Associate Professor of Humanitarian Logistics,  Kühne Logistics University, Hamburg, Germany

Abstract: The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies Case

International humanitarian organizations (IHOs) frequently implement both development and disaster response programs. Based on the programs' operational needs, IHOs estimate the operational expenditures and then appeal for donations. Their operations and actual operational expenditures depend on the donations that they receive. They face budget constraints; some programs are overfunded, while others are underfunded. In this paper, using multiple regression analysis, we estimate the responsiveness of donations to a number of variables, including fundraising costs, operational costs included in the appeal, profile of the country where the program takes place and disaster criticality, and we then link donations and fundraising effort with actual operational expenditures. We also study whether some types of operational expenditures require higher fundraising efforts than others. We use data from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), which is one of the largest IHOs. Data on development programs come from the 243 development programs implemented by the IFRC in the period from 2010-2012. Data on disaster responses' programs cover the 80 disasters that the IFRC responded to in the time period from January 2010 to April 2014.

 Bio: Professor Maria Besiou is Associate Professor of Humanitarian Logistics at the Kuehne Logistics University (KLU). She received her Ph.D. in Operations Management from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH) in Greece. She holds a Diploma in Mechanical Engineering from AUTH. Before joining the KLU she worked as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at INSEAD. Professor Besiou's main research interests are in humanitarian logistics, closed-loop supply chains, and stakeholder media. Her research appears in several case studies and award-winning papers in peer-review international journals like Production and Operations Management, European Journal of Operational Research, Journal of Business Ethics, California Management Review, and the Journal of Industrial Ecology. She serves as the Vice President of Outreach of the Humanitarian Operations and Crisis Management Chapter of the Productions and Operations Management Society and as the Coordinator of the Humanitarian Operations Working Group of EURO Society.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Technological Institute 2145 Sheridan Road CEE Seminar Roon - A230 Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, November 12, 2015

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Business Case for Higher Speed Freight Trains

Joint Sandhouse Rail Group Meeting and NUTC Seminar

SpeakerDavid Burns, Railroad Industrial Engineering Consultant

Rail is usually considered to be the transport mode of choice for transporting freight longer distances, yet in the USA only 15% of freight, for distances more than 2000 miles, is by rail.  For long distances many shippers are spending 2 to 3 times rail freight rates as they need faster and more reliable service than the railroads can provide.  As an indication of the rail potential shippers are spending, annually, $28 billion dollars on moving freight by truck over 1000 miles.  

 There are a number of reasons rail is not able to take advantage of the long distance market. A higher speed freight train will consume up to 3 train paths of 50 mph freight trains. There is significant increase in track maintenance cost if heavy freight trains travel at higher speeds, signaling for higher speeds and longer stopping distances, and the lack of a reliable low maintenance, high axle load, track friendly freight wagon truck for speeds over 70 mph.

 As part of the FRA's research into higher speed passenger trains, research was funded for higher speed freight. As part of the justification for this research, a study was commissioned to focus on the business case for higher speed freight trains.  

The study came to interesting specific conclusions. If higher speed freight trains could be operated as the second section of a passenger train, this would minimize the impact on line capacity and could generate a rail revenue of as much as $1 million per train!  Overall, higher speed freight trains could produce about $3 billion revenue from fresh produce and other priority food products. Revenues of about $250 million from overnight intermodal and $750 million from mail and express/courier are possible.  Importantly, the potential rail revenue could reduce the freight railroads' opposition to passenger trains.

 The presentation will explain the problems of operating freight at higher speeds, the logistics chain requirements, and the potential market for this premium type of service.

 BIO:  David Burns gained his railroad experience working 8 years for the Illinois Central Railroad, and then for 38 years he has been a railroad industrial engineering consultant.  He has undertaken numerous industrial engineering, economic, and financial studies covering most aspects of railroad operations, maintenance, and the railroad's role in the logistics chain.  Recently he researched a FRA funded study for the business case for higher speed freight trains. He has written and had published 60 plus articles and papers on various aspects of technical and marketing of rail operations.  He also brings an international prospective to his experience in that he has had consulting assignments on 45 national railway systems around the World. 

 

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - Lower Level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/

Thursday, November 19, 2015

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Semiparametric Estimates of the Willingness to Pay for Autonomous Electric Vehicles

Seminar Speaker:   Ricardo A Daziano, David Croll Fellow Assistant Professor
School of Civil and Environmental Engineering,  Cornell University

Abstract: 

Autonomous vehicles use sensing and communication technologies to navigate safely and efficiently with little or no input from the driver. These driverless technologies will create an unprecedented revolution in how people move, and policymakers will need appropriate tools to plan and analyze the large impacts of novel navigation systems. In this paper we derive semiparametric estimates of the willingness to pay for automation. We use data  from a nation-wide online panel of 1,260 individuals who answered a vehicle-purchase discrete choice experiment focused on energy efficiency and autonomous features. Several models were estimated with the choice microdata, including a conditional logit with deterministic consumer heterogeneity, a parametric random parameter logit, and a semi-parametric random parameter logit (with assumption-free heterogeneity distributions that are a mixture of normals). Regarding operating costs, specifications with both endogenous and exogenous discounting were considered.  

 Bio:  Ricardo A. Daziano is the David Croll Fellow Assistant Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University. He received a PhD in economics from Laval University in 2010. Daziano's research focuses on engineering decision making, specifically on theoretical and applied econometrics of consumer behavior and discrete choice models applied to technological innovation in transportation and energy. Daziano's specific empirical research interests include the analysis of air travel demand, the study of pro-environmental preferences toward low-emission vehicles, modeling the adoption of sustainable travel behavior, estimating willingness-to-pay for renewable energy, and forecasting consumers' response to environmentally-friendly energy sources.

Contact Info: Diana Marek

Location: Chambers Hall 600 Foster St Ruan Conference Center - lower level Evanston IL 60208

Event URL: http://www.transportation.northwestern.edu/